weather
09/20/2018 9:08:07 AM
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If you were to pick the perfect temperature in run the perfect race what would it be? How much slower will you run when the temp is above 90.
If you were to pick the perfect temperature in run the perfect race what would it be? How much slower will you run when the temp is above 90.
09/20/2018 9:15:49 AM
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@zoughaibs 55 Degrees with a light mist.
@zoughaibs

55 Degrees with a light mist.
09/20/2018 10:31:57 AM
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Account for Heat by Jeff Galloway The hot and sticky days of summer are here. Make sure that you are making some adjustments in your running. Most runners begin to slow down at 55 degrees and start suffering at 65 degrees. Of course, the body can adapt to heat stress and push the threshold up a bit, but you usually can't run as fast on a 75 degee day as on a 45 degree one. High humidity is also a major problem. It's like a wet blanket; it doesn't allow much evaporation or perspiration and your body heat builds up. If you try to run too hard in hot or humid conditions you'll hit "the wall" sooner than expected. Trying to maintain a goal pace in heat is like going out too fast early in the race. Temperatures generally increase hour by hour; therefore you must adjust your pace for the temperature expected at the end of the race. Adjusting Race Pace for Heat: Estimated temperature at finish - Slower than goal pace - 8 min mile becomes... 55-60 degrees - 1% - 8:05 60-65 degrees - 3% - 8:15 65-70 degrees - 5% - 8:25 70-75 degrees - 7% - 8:35 75-80 degrees - 12% - 8:58 80-85 degrees - 20% - 9:35 Above 85 degrees - Forget it... run for fun * Note: This chart is based upon my own experience in the heat and talking to other runners. It has no scientific verification.
Account for Heat
by Jeff Galloway
The hot and sticky days of summer are here. Make sure that you are making some adjustments in your running. Most runners begin to slow down at 55 degrees and start suffering at 65 degrees. Of course, the body can adapt to heat stress and push the threshold up a bit, but you usually can't run as fast on a 75 degee day as on a 45 degree one. High humidity is also a major problem. It's like a wet blanket; it doesn't allow much evaporation or perspiration and your body heat builds up.

If you try to run too hard in hot or humid conditions you'll hit "the wall" sooner than expected. Trying to maintain a goal pace in heat is like going out too fast early in the race. Temperatures generally increase hour by hour; therefore you must adjust your pace for the temperature expected at the end of the race.

Adjusting Race Pace for Heat: Estimated temperature at finish - Slower than goal pace - 8 min mile becomes...
55-60 degrees - 1% - 8:05
60-65 degrees - 3% - 8:15
65-70 degrees - 5% - 8:25
70-75 degrees - 7% - 8:35
75-80 degrees - 12% - 8:58
80-85 degrees - 20% - 9:35
Above 85 degrees - Forget it... run for fun

* Note: This chart is based upon my own experience in the heat and talking to other runners. It has no scientific verification.
09/20/2018 11:24:36 AM
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I like it around 70 degrees myself, but most of my kids prefer even colder so long as it isn't raining. There's not really a super scientific way to predict how much slower people run in the heat because everyone is effected by the heat differently, and in my personal experience girls tend to vary much more than boys on my team. Anecdotally, I have two girls who run with each other almost every day (including races) but when its been over 90 degrees, one of them consistently has a bigger drop off than the girl she runs with.
I like it around 70 degrees myself, but most of my kids prefer even colder so long as it isn't raining. There's not really a super scientific way to predict how much slower people run in the heat because everyone is effected by the heat differently, and in my personal experience girls tend to vary much more than boys on my team. Anecdotally, I have two girls who run with each other almost every day (including races) but when its been over 90 degrees, one of them consistently has a bigger drop off than the girl she runs with.
09/20/2018 9:31:04 PM
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I think 50s and cloudy with no breeze is as perfect as it gets for distance running. I've seen multiple studies over the years showing that mid 40s to mid 50s is idea depending on the distance. Here is an article that was written recently that mentions a few of these: [url=https://www.elitedaily.com/wellness/best-temperature-for-running/2023285]https://www.elitedaily.com/wellness/best-temperature-for-running/2023285[/url] I've also read a number of studies on heat and humidity and its impact. Here is one: [url=https://runnersconnect.net/dew-point-effect-running/]https://runnersconnect.net/dew-point-effect-running/[/url]
I think 50s and cloudy with no breeze is as perfect as it gets for distance running. I've seen multiple studies over the years showing that mid 40s to mid 50s is idea depending on the distance. Here is an article that was written recently that mentions a few of these:

https://www.elitedaily.com/wellness/best-temperature-for-running/2023285

I've also read a number of studies on heat and humidity and its impact. Here is one:

https://runnersconnect.net/dew-point-effect-running/

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