Weight Lifting and the Championship Season
10/21/2009 11:13:11 AM
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What are your thoughts on kids maxing out on squads and other leg related lifts during the weeks of your Conference, District, Sectionals (Class 4 guys), and State? I had a doctor (a very, very intelligent sports doctor) tell me that the benefits of squats are far outweighed by the potential detriment to the runner. Thoughts?
What are your thoughts on kids maxing out on squads and other leg related lifts during the weeks of your Conference, District, Sectionals (Class 4 guys), and State?

I had a doctor (a very, very intelligent sports doctor) tell me that the benefits of squats are far outweighed by the potential detriment to the runner.

Thoughts?
10/21/2009 1:09:55 PM
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i tell all my runners to stay off the weights...period, end of story, for the entire season. we do lots of hill work to stimulate strength. much better to develop functional strength than to go up and down with a bar on your shoulders.
i tell all my runners to stay off the weights...period, end of story, for the entire season. we do lots of hill work to stimulate strength. much better to develop functional strength than to go up and down with a bar on your shoulders.
10/21/2009 1:14:04 PM
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Weight lifting (as long as it is running specific weight lifting with low weight and high reps) is great for strength buidling and injury prevention. Most great runners supplement their running with some type of lifting. That said, I personally am not a big fan of weight lifting in high schooler. I see too many risks. Have you been lifting all season? If not, you definitely don't want to do it during championship season. If you have, they can still lift, but I would do fewer days or fewer reps with lighter weight. I think it would be best to cut them off. We don't lift, but we do a lot of strength work and we stop it the week of district. As far as maxing...why would a runner ever max on any lift? That is completely pointless.
Weight lifting (as long as it is running specific weight lifting with low weight and high reps) is great for strength buidling and injury prevention. Most great runners supplement their running with some type of lifting. That said, I personally am not a big fan of weight lifting in high schooler. I see too many risks.

Have you been lifting all season? If not, you definitely don't want to do it during championship season. If you have, they can still lift, but I would do fewer days or fewer reps with lighter weight. I think it would be best to cut them off. We don't lift, but we do a lot of strength work and we stop it the week of district.

As far as maxing...why would a runner ever max on any lift? That is completely pointless.
10/21/2009 2:09:25 PM
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I'm a big fan of weightlifting throughout the year for runners, under the proper training regimen (none of that 3x6 maxing out stuff). A lot of benefit can be gained from doing drills/plyometrics/hills, but often that isn't enough for a runner to develop the strength and form needed for really good running economy. I think I remember Coach Hipp once saying that the most important things to focus on with young runners is building an aerobic base and focusing on building good form, because these things cannot be changed later in their running career. I agree wholeheartedly. However, many high school kids, especially runners, don't have a lot of experience in the weight room so they need to be supervised so that they are using the proper technique, so as not to get injured. It would be better for runners to avoid weights altogether than to have kids lifting improperly. It is ironic that many coaches are worried about these kids hurting themselves in the weight room, since strength training is one of the best injury prevention tools for a runner. But, you should always start them in the off-season, and always start VERY easy. Now, to your original question. At the end of the season (last 2 weeks), I would stay away from the weight room. There isn't going to be any extra benefit gained from hitting the weights an extra 2 weeks if you do it all year. Unlike the running portion of training, you don't need to lift to stay loose and stay sharp, which is all you are doing at the end of the season, other than recovering. For some people it takes 20 miles in a week to stay loose and sharp, for others it takes 70 (this is why tapering is individualized), but I've never met a runner who needed to get in the weight room to taper.
I'm a big fan of weightlifting throughout the year for runners, under the proper training regimen (none of that 3x6 maxing out stuff). A lot of benefit can be gained from doing drills/plyometrics/hills, but often that isn't enough for a runner to develop the strength and form needed for really good running economy.

I think I remember Coach Hipp once saying that the most important things to focus on with young runners is building an aerobic base and focusing on building good form, because these things cannot be changed later in their running career. I agree wholeheartedly.

However, many high school kids, especially runners, don't have a lot of experience in the weight room so they need to be supervised so that they are using the proper technique, so as not to get injured. It would be better for runners to avoid weights altogether than to have kids lifting improperly. It is ironic that many coaches are worried about these kids hurting themselves in the weight room, since strength training is one of the best injury prevention tools for a runner. But, you should always start them in the off-season, and always start VERY easy.

Now, to your original question. At the end of the season (last 2 weeks), I would stay away from the weight room. There isn't going to be any extra benefit gained from hitting the weights an extra 2 weeks if you do it all year. Unlike the running portion of training, you don't need to lift to stay loose and stay sharp, which is all you are doing at the end of the season, other than recovering. For some people it takes 20 miles in a week to stay loose and sharp, for others it takes 70 (this is why tapering is individualized), but I've never met a runner who needed to get in the weight room to taper.
10/21/2009 2:48:05 PM
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The reason I asked is because several of my runners have weight lifting class for a PE credit and maxing out is part of their grade. Do any other coaches run into similar situations and how is it handled?
The reason I asked is because several of my runners have weight lifting class for a PE credit and maxing out is part of their grade. Do any other coaches run into similar situations and how is it handled?
10/21/2009 3:16:18 PM
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Coach We had a problem with this in 2002. The Friday morning before the state meet we had two girls in a weight lifting class as part of the class they had to max out in squats and I think bench press. Well this resulted in tight quads on race day and we finished 2nd by 6 points. Here at Herculaneum we have adopted the BFS lifting program, now at first I was a little concerned with all of the heavy weight low reps, but since we started the program we have had less injuries the past two years. Our kids follow the in-season program, were they lift on Monday (incline press / power cleans / front squats) and Wednesday (parallel squats / bench press / hex bar dead lift) and do plyos on Tuesday and Thursday, Friday is an off day. We also do not lift the last 2-3 weeks of the season. Speak with the PE teacher and see if there is some kind of alternate schedule you can come up with for your kids.
Coach

We had a problem with this in 2002. The Friday morning before the state meet we had two girls in a weight lifting class as part of the class they had to max out in squats and I think bench press. Well this resulted in tight quads on race day and we finished 2nd by 6 points. Here at Herculaneum we have adopted the BFS lifting program, now at first I was a little concerned with all of the heavy weight low reps, but since we started the program we have had less injuries the past two years. Our kids follow the in-season program, were they lift on Monday (incline press / power cleans / front squats) and Wednesday (parallel squats / bench press / hex bar dead lift) and do plyos on Tuesday and Thursday, Friday is an off day. We also do not lift the last 2-3 weeks of the season. Speak with the PE teacher and see if there is some kind of alternate schedule you can come up with for your kids.
10/21/2009 4:54:10 PM
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My take on Jakes question is that these kids having to max out during your peaking phase is definitely a negative thing. I think you'd be asking for the what the person above explained...soreness, etc... Max efforts also are when you're at risk the most for injury. We coaches wouldn't do any maximal efforts like this during our peaking phase with running specific training so definitely we wouldn't want to do it in non-specific training. Hopefully the weight room teacher will work with you. I'd say this is a common problem I hear from recruits all the time. To comment on what Michael said I do believe that the biggest focus for young runners should be developing an aerobic base and improving running efficiency. The aerobic base can be improved virtually forever but it takes years to develop to elite levels. So we need to start young and progress gradually. Running efficiency and good form is easy to correct with younger runners but very very difficult to correct once the runner has matured. Our bodies learn to run a certain way and strengthen themselves to run that way. If we can make the changes before our bodies develop we have a better chance to develop good form. Work hard on drills with those 15 and younger and keep working on them after too. Every little bit of improvement helps. Lots of running drills, mobility work and defintitely age appropriate strength training for high schoolers and expecially middle schoolers. Taking this a little further we do lift weights and complete a significant amount of strength training at Missouri State. On a near daily basis we complete a "Pre-Run Routine" that is a about a 8 minute general strength, mobility and injury prevention routine. Lots of hip mobility and lower leg, foot and ankle strength. This serves as out pre-run warm-up for our distance runs. On a daily basis we do a core routine as well after runs. We alternate between a general core routine (crunchs, traditional ab exercises, medicine ball, etc..) one day and core stability (pedestal style exercises) the other. Twice per week we get into the weight room to accomplish three primary goals...1.) Injury Prevention and 2.) Improve Posture, 3.) Improve our ability to handle impact forces...a.k.a. improve stability. Preventing injuries allows us to train more consistently...therefore we become faster. Improved posture and improved stability in time makes us more efficient runners....therefore we run faster. More effiecent runners tent to get injured less too. In the weight room we do upper and lower body work. Upper body we do things like dumbell rows, lat pulls, shoulder circuit with dumbells, push-ups and pull-ups. Lower body we do a lot of single leg lifts so we have to stabalize on one leg. Exercises like step-ups, one leg squats and several different types of lunges. We also do one heavey loading lift with a front squat. The front squat isn't in itself specific to running but it is specific to injury prevention. Loading exercises promote bone health which helps us prevent stress fractures. We also do several other exercises such as hyperextension, reverse hypers, and we do several general injury prevention exercises like band walks, ankle band exercises and foot crawl. We have two routines that we work through (do each once per week). Each routine takes about 35-45 minutes including core. We don't introduce new exercises during the season. Introducing something new usually creates soreness and we don't need to deal with that stress during the season. We'll change up our routines but only between seasons. We do lift year round including during our peaking phase. We just scale things back a little during our final phase. I think it's important to continue lifting up until at least the final 10 days so that we maintain the strength levels we've built. Maintenance is important. Last thing...boys don't lift to get that beach body. Lift to be a better runner. Stay specfic to your running needs. You can ruin your chances of running to your potential by lifting the wrong way to "look good". Ok, that's my long take on strength training in the 10 minutes I had before practice. Hope I didn't miss anything I meant to add. I'm happy to e-mail our strength training program to any high school coach if anyone is interested.
My take on Jakes question is that these kids having to max out during your peaking phase is definitely a negative thing. I think you'd be asking for the what the person above explained...soreness, etc... Max efforts also are when you're at risk the most for injury. We coaches wouldn't do any maximal efforts like this during our peaking phase with running specific training so definitely we wouldn't want to do it in non-specific training. Hopefully the weight room teacher will work with you. I'd say this is a common problem I hear from recruits all the time.

To comment on what Michael said I do believe that the biggest focus for young runners should be developing an aerobic base and improving running efficiency. The aerobic base can be improved virtually forever but it takes years to develop to elite levels. So we need to start young and progress gradually. Running efficiency and good form is easy to correct with younger runners but very very difficult to correct once the runner has matured. Our bodies learn to run a certain way and strengthen themselves to run that way. If we can make the changes before our bodies develop we have a better chance to develop good form. Work hard on drills with those 15 and younger and keep working on them after too. Every little bit of improvement helps. Lots of running drills, mobility work and defintitely age appropriate strength training for high schoolers and expecially middle schoolers.

Taking this a little further we do lift weights and complete a significant amount of strength training at Missouri State. On a near daily basis we complete a "Pre-Run Routine" that is a about a 8 minute general strength, mobility and injury prevention routine. Lots of hip mobility and lower leg, foot and ankle strength. This serves as out pre-run warm-up for our distance runs. On a daily basis we do a core routine as well after runs. We alternate between a general core routine (crunchs, traditional ab exercises, medicine ball, etc..) one day and core stability (pedestal style exercises) the other. Twice per week we get into the weight room to accomplish three primary goals...1.) Injury Prevention and 2.) Improve Posture, 3.) Improve our ability to handle impact forces...a.k.a. improve stability.

Preventing injuries allows us to train more consistently...therefore we become faster. Improved posture and improved stability in time makes us more efficient runners....therefore we run faster. More effiecent runners tent to get injured less too.

In the weight room we do upper and lower body work. Upper body we do things like dumbell rows, lat pulls, shoulder circuit with dumbells, push-ups and pull-ups. Lower body we do a lot of single leg lifts so we have to stabalize on one leg. Exercises like step-ups, one leg squats and several different types of lunges. We also do one heavey loading lift with a front squat. The front squat isn't in itself specific to running but it is specific to injury prevention. Loading exercises promote bone health which helps us prevent stress fractures. We also do several other exercises such as hyperextension, reverse hypers, and we do several general injury prevention exercises like band walks, ankle band exercises and foot crawl.

We have two routines that we work through (do each once per week). Each routine takes about 35-45 minutes including core. We don't introduce new exercises during the season. Introducing something new usually creates soreness and we don't need to deal with that stress during the season. We'll change up our routines but only between seasons.

We do lift year round including during our peaking phase. We just scale things back a little during our final phase. I think it's important to continue lifting up until at least the final 10 days so that we maintain the strength levels we've built. Maintenance is important.

Last thing...boys don't lift to get that beach body. Lift to be a better runner. Stay specfic to your running needs. You can ruin your chances of running to your potential by lifting the wrong way to "look good".

Ok, that's my long take on strength training in the 10 minutes I had before practice. Hope I didn't miss anything I meant to add. I'm happy to e-mail our strength training program to any high school coach if anyone is interested.
10/21/2009 8:08:28 PM
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To answer your question on how to deal with the pe coaches just go down and talk to them to see if they can modify their workouts just for the next two or three weeks before state or you could maybe just ask them for a day off a day or two before the big meet usually the coaches/pe teachers in my building have been very understanding to this need for a day or two.
To answer your question on how to deal with the pe coaches just go down and talk to them to see if they can modify their workouts just for the next two or three weeks before state or you could maybe just ask them for a day off a day or two before the big meet usually the coaches/pe teachers in my building have been very understanding to this need for a day or two.
10/21/2009 10:55:20 PM
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I had good results from having my runners lifting during the season. I found that so many of my kids were so sedentary coming into the program, that I could barely train them. So I added weights, supplementry work for core strength, agility, lower leg stability, etc. We concentrated on making them better athletes. As they progressed through the program, we could add more volume but, continued the supplementry work and weights, because of the decrease in injuries. That said; it must be taught and supervised! Regarding the original post, I always cut the lifting and extras as we began the peaking series. The idea was to give more rest and allow for super-compensation. Regarding the PE teachers, I always went straight to the teachers and allowed as how we were all on the same page and working for the kids growth and education. If adults can't agree to compromise over something as simple as a PE grade, the kids are learning something as well and it's probably not what we would hope. I have always had success with this approach. Although, one time I had to get the Principal on my side and allow the gym teacher to give the kid an incomplete. The kid gladly did the required weight room testing the week after state. Sometimes teachers need to be reminded we all teach kids NOT subjects. My subject area is just a samll part of educating the total person. Regarding the very smart doctor. I've recently read studies that say cool downs aren't necessary. I'm having trouble going against everything I've always taught. I might go along with it in cross country, but what is the effect of not cooling down in multiple performances on the same day, as in track and field? That wasn't part of any study I've found so far. What do you guys think? Until there is a good study of lifting and it's effects on peaking and performance, I'm still cutting it out. I don't doubt for a minute the intelligence on the doctor you sited. I am reminded that the person who graduates first in his class is called the Validictorian. The guy who graduates last in his class at West Point is called Sir and the guy who graduates last in his class in med school is called "doctor." Not meant as an insult to doctors, but rather to take anyones advice and run it through your own validity test. Sorry, I guess I should have included women officers and doctors in the above.
I had good results from having my runners lifting during the season. I found that so many of my kids were so sedentary coming into the program, that I could barely train them. So I added weights, supplementry work for core strength, agility, lower leg stability, etc. We concentrated on making them better athletes. As they progressed through the program, we could add more volume but, continued the supplementry work and weights, because of the decrease in injuries.

That said; it must be taught and supervised! Regarding the original post, I always cut the lifting and extras as we began the peaking series. The idea was to give more rest and allow for super-compensation.

Regarding the PE teachers, I always went straight to the teachers and allowed as how we were all on the same page and working for the kids growth and education. If adults can't agree to compromise over something as simple as a PE grade, the kids are learning something as well and it's probably not what we would hope. I have always had success with this approach. Although, one time I had to get the Principal on my side and allow the gym teacher to give the kid an incomplete. The kid gladly did the required weight room testing the week after state. Sometimes teachers need to be reminded we all teach kids NOT subjects. My subject area is just a samll part of educating the total person.

Regarding the very smart doctor. I've recently read studies that say cool downs aren't necessary. I'm having trouble going against everything I've always taught. I might go along with it in cross country, but what is the effect of not cooling down in multiple performances on the same day, as in track and field? That wasn't part of any study I've found so far. What do you guys think? Until there is a good study of lifting and it's effects on peaking and performance, I'm still cutting it out.
I don't doubt for a minute the intelligence on the doctor you sited. I am reminded that the person who graduates first in his class is called the Validictorian. The guy who graduates last in his class at West Point is called Sir and the guy who graduates last in his class in med school is called "doctor." Not meant as an insult to doctors, but rather to take anyones advice and run it through your own validity test. Sorry, I guess I should have included women officers and doctors in the above.
10/21/2009 11:08:48 PM
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Interesting website and article on this very subject http://www.elitetrack.com/blogs/details/4866/
Interesting website and article on this very subject

http://www.elitetrack.com/blogs/details/4866/
10/22/2009 9:46:42 AM
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I personally don't follow a weight lifting during my training cycles and I don't generally put my athletes on one either. I tend to do a lot of core work...sit-ups, dips, pushups, pullups, etc.... Off of this type of work(no lifting) I can benchpress my weight(150lbs) with a little bit additional on top. I don't think that's too bad for a distance Runner. My athletes don't seriously lift in season but they also follow a routine of the core exercises listed above. They start to lift more in the off season when they begin conditioning for track, as my head track coach will set them up with a program. I am not against weight training for distance athletes, and maybe I would follow a routine as well if I had more time. But I have had a lot of success with my core program so I have stuck with that.
I personally don't follow a weight lifting during my training cycles and I don't generally put my athletes on one either.

I tend to do a lot of core work...sit-ups, dips, pushups, pullups, etc.... Off of this type of work(no lifting) I can benchpress my weight(150lbs) with a little bit additional on top. I don't think that's too bad for a distance Runner.

My athletes don't seriously lift in season but they also follow a routine of the core exercises listed above. They start to lift more in the off season when they begin conditioning for track, as my head track coach will set them up with a program.

I am not against weight training for distance athletes, and maybe I would follow a routine as well if I had more time. But I have had a lot of success with my core program so I have stuck with that.
10/22/2009 9:58:59 AM
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I've found the best approach to discussing this with PE coaches is to first be friends with them. If you have a good relationship, they'll bend for you. Don't approach them with the attitude that cross country is more important than their class or more important than lifting weights. Most people tend to think that what they are in charge of is important. Just stress the importance of this part of the season, and explain why you think the students should max out after state. If they are reasonable people, they'll probably be okay with it.
I've found the best approach to discussing this with PE coaches is to first be friends with them. If you have a good relationship, they'll bend for you.

Don't approach them with the attitude that cross country is more important than their class or more important than lifting weights. Most people tend to think that what they are in charge of is important. Just stress the importance of this part of the season, and explain why you think the students should max out after state. If they are reasonable people, they'll probably be okay with it.
10/22/2009 4:47:05 PM
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If you read MichaelFarmer's post closely, you will notice him refer to high school runners as "kids". Congratulations, Mr. Farmer, you are now officially an old man. :-D Sean Nunn Raytown South
If you read MichaelFarmer's post closely, you will notice him refer to high school runners as "kids". Congratulations, Mr. Farmer, you are now officially an old man.

Sean Nunn
Raytown South
10/22/2009 6:09:42 PM
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Some studies to consider. [b]J Strength Cond Res.[/b] 2008 Nov;22(6):2036-44 [i]The effects of resistance training on endurance distance running performance among highly trained runners: a systematic review[/i]. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18978605 [b]Sports Med.[/b] 2003;33(7):539-52 [i]The impact of resistance training on distance running performance[/i]. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12762828 [b]Int J Sports Med.[/b] 2009 Jan;30(1):27-32. Epub 2008 Oct 30. [i]Effects of strength training on running economy[/i]. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18975259 [b]J Strength Cond Res[/b]. 2008 Jul;22(4):1176-83. [i]Running-specific, periodized strength training attenuates loss of stride length during intense endurance running[/i]. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18545191 [b]NSCA
Some studies to consider.

J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Nov;22(6):2036-44
The effects of resistance training on endurance distance running performance among highly trained runners: a systematic review.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18978605

Sports Med. 2003;33(7):539-52
The impact of resistance training on distance running performance.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12762828

Int J Sports Med. 2009 Jan;30(1):27-32. Epub 2008 Oct 30.
Effects of strength training on running economy.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18975259

J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Jul;22(4):1176-83.
Running-specific, periodized strength training attenuates loss of stride length during intense endurance running.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18545191

NSCA
09/30/2020 3:22:32 AM
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Taking this a little further we do lift weights and complete a significant amount of strength training at Missouri State. On a near daily basis we complete a "Pre-Run Routine" that is a about a 8 minute general strength, mobility and injury prevention routine. Lots of hip mobility and lower leg, foot and ankle strength. This serves as out pre-run warm-up for our distance runs. On a daily basis we do a core routine as well after runs.
Taking this a little further we do lift weights and complete a significant amount of strength training at Missouri State. On a near daily basis we complete a "Pre-Run Routine" that is a about a 8 minute general strength, mobility and injury prevention routine. Lots of hip mobility and lower leg, foot and ankle strength. This serves as out pre-run warm-up for our distance runs. On a daily basis we do a core routine as well after runs.
09/30/2020 12:02:38 PM
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We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home. We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.
We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home.
We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.
09/30/2020 12:02:38 PM
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We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home. We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.
We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home.
We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.
09/30/2020 12:02:38 PM
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We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home. We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.
We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home.
We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.
09/30/2020 12:02:38 PM
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We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home. We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.
We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home.
We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.
09/30/2020 12:02:38 PM
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We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home. We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.
We don't lift for cross country but we do yoga twice a week, Ice bath on Thursdays and a lot of hip mobility stuff. I agree with the coach that said running hills will do the trick instead of squats. We also do planks and tons of agilities before and after a workout. We also elevate their legs on a wall before they go home.
We lift 3 days a week for track but I had a professional body Builder who is also a personal trainer design my workout and he even comes from time to time and supervises my kids in the weight room.

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