Schools that run the most mileage
10/06/2011 7:13:30 PM
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So I've been fascinated lately by reading about schools like York over in Elmhurst. I didn't even know who they were until I was reading about Rock Bridge going over to Palatine and taking 2nd place and beating them. I've read countless Letsrun threads about how much mileage they run and I find it fairly interesting reading everybody's opinions on those teams. I even went as far as to go on Hulu and watch "The Long Green Line" focusing on the York team. But I was wondering which high schools run the most mileage in Missouri. I hear speculation all the time but I wasn't sure if anybody actually had facts. I've heard Potosi used to run 100-mile weeks all summer. I wasn't sure if that was true or exaggeration. I've heard West Plains does two-a-days year round....wasn't sure if that was true. I've heard that SLUH is more middling and doesn't run that kind of mileage (again, just speculation - I don't know anybody over there). Does anybody actually know what the big programs like SLUH, Liberty, Rock Bridge, Rockhurst, West Plains, Ft. Zumwalt South, and Potosi are really doing. Most of them are obviously good because they have a lot of kids out for the team, but are any of these teams putting in that much mileage? I don't necessarily want to turn this into an argument for or against high mileage, but am just curious if anybody had any insights into what schools traditionally run high mileage. I'd also be interested in hearing what kind of mileage some of our most successful runners in years past have been running like Colleen Quigley, Emily Sisson, Daniel and David Everett, Zach Herriot, Josh Mathis and Thebeau, etc... I'm not looking for training tips or anything. I'm very happy with how my kids train, but it's always interesting to hear what other schools are doing as well. When I first read about York I didn't know high schoolers ever ran that much mileage, it was surprising to me, but maybe it's more normal than I think? Thanks, Thomas Rennier
So I've been fascinated lately by reading about schools like York over in Elmhurst. I didn't even know who they were until I was reading about Rock Bridge going over to Palatine and taking 2nd place and beating them. I've read countless Letsrun threads about how much mileage they run and I find it fairly interesting reading everybody's opinions on those teams. I even went as far as to go on Hulu and watch "The Long Green Line" focusing on the York team.

But I was wondering which high schools run the most mileage in Missouri. I hear speculation all the time but I wasn't sure if anybody actually had facts. I've heard Potosi used to run 100-mile weeks all summer. I wasn't sure if that was true or exaggeration. I've heard West Plains does two-a-days year round....wasn't sure if that was true. I've heard that SLUH is more middling and doesn't run that kind of mileage (again, just speculation - I don't know anybody over there).

Does anybody actually know what the big programs like SLUH, Liberty, Rock Bridge, Rockhurst, West Plains, Ft. Zumwalt South, and Potosi are really doing. Most of them are obviously good because they have a lot of kids out for the team, but are any of these teams putting in that much mileage?

I don't necessarily want to turn this into an argument for or against high mileage, but am just curious if anybody had any insights into what schools traditionally run high mileage.

I'd also be interested in hearing what kind of mileage some of our most successful runners in years past have been running like Colleen Quigley, Emily Sisson, Daniel and David Everett, Zach Herriot, Josh Mathis and Thebeau, etc...

I'm not looking for training tips or anything. I'm very happy with how my kids train, but it's always interesting to hear what other schools are doing as well. When I first read about York I didn't know high schoolers ever ran that much mileage, it was surprising to me, but maybe it's more normal than I think?

Thanks,
Thomas Rennier
10/06/2011 7:33:19 PM
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Ask my daughter how much mileage she ran last week and she wouldn't be able to tell you. I don't think her coach would be able tell you either. My point being that some programs aren't mileage based at all. It's tempting though to try and establish a metric with which successful programs can be measured. In this case Quality and Quantity are not always relateble. I guess it's how those miles are run that matters.
Ask my daughter how much mileage she ran last week and she wouldn't be able to tell you. I don't think her coach would be able tell you either. My point being that some programs aren't mileage based at all. It's tempting though to try and establish a metric with which successful programs can be measured. In this case Quality and Quantity are not always relateble. I guess it's how those miles are run that matters.
10/06/2011 8:59:06 PM
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as a runner at a high school that won state every year I was there, I can honestly say that I ran SOME 100-mile weeks back then. but I never ran more than ONE 100-mile week a month, and none after the racing season started. the shoes we wore back then were laughable by today's standards, so I am thinking that current runners are capable of logging more mileage with less damage simply because of the great progress in footwear. but I never had my teams even approach that kind of mileage. my elite athletes at Southwest topped out at 60-70 miles per week. I always set the minimum at 35 mpw. That seemed to be the threshold for our kids having a realistic chance at making all-state in the small school divisions. but there is no substitute for genetics. there are just some kids who will never be fast, no matter how many miles they log.
as a runner at a high school that won state every year I was there, I can honestly say that I ran SOME 100-mile weeks back then. but I never ran more than ONE 100-mile week a month, and none after the racing season started.

the shoes we wore back then were laughable by today's standards, so I am thinking that current runners are capable of logging more mileage with less damage simply because of the great progress in footwear.

but I never had my teams even approach that kind of mileage. my elite athletes at Southwest topped out at 60-70 miles per week. I always set the minimum at 35 mpw. That seemed to be the threshold for our kids having a realistic chance at making all-state in the small school divisions.

but there is no substitute for genetics. there are just some kids who will never be fast, no matter how many miles they log.
10/06/2011 10:03:41 PM
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I'm just curious. I think it can be different for everybody. We have a kid on the team that should be Top 10 in Class 3 as a junior. And he hasn't run over 45 miles in a week. I used to run marathons and half-marathons off of 55-60 miles/week. But like a poster said above, that is just an estimate for the most part. I tended to run for time and not miles.
I'm just curious. I think it can be different for everybody. We have a kid on the team that should be Top 10 in Class 3 as a junior. And he hasn't run over 45 miles in a week.

I used to run marathons and half-marathons off of 55-60 miles/week. But like a poster said above, that is just an estimate for the most part. I tended to run for time and not miles.
10/06/2011 10:19:28 PM
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@hansel960 I can't speak to the programs like West Plains and Potosi but I can let you know what I did. From the first day of Cross Country Practice in 2010 to State I averaged 37 miles a week. My highest mileage week in high school was 50. I was around the same mid-thirty range in the winter and up until May where I dropped to the mid-twenties. My coaches did a great job of focusing on quality not quantity. Sadly, 35 miles a week does not cut it in college. The adjustment has gone well and I am looking to see how the higher mileage works out for me. Daniel Everett
@hansel960

I can't speak to the programs like West Plains and Potosi but I can let you know what I did. From the first day of Cross Country Practice in 2010 to State I averaged 37 miles a week. My highest mileage week in high school was 50. I was around the same mid-thirty range in the winter and up until May where I dropped to the mid-twenties. My coaches did a great job of focusing on quality not quantity. Sadly, 35 miles a week does not cut it in college. The adjustment has gone well and I am looking to see how the higher mileage works out for me.

Daniel Everett
10/06/2011 10:38:47 PM
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Being a top runner from one of the listed schools I can tell you that mileage is definitely big. 70 mile weeks is not uncommon at all. 2-a-days four times a week, and weekend runs. High mileage is something that is just part of our schedule. I'm not going to go into the specifics of what I do to train because I don't know if my coach would want me to do that but in season we do cut it back a bit from what we do in the summer/winter. Mostly because of workouts, though. That accounts for a bit of the mileage drop.
Being a top runner from one of the listed schools I can tell you that mileage is definitely big. 70 mile weeks is not uncommon at all. 2-a-days four times a week, and weekend runs. High mileage is something that is just part of our schedule. I'm not going to go into the specifics of what I do to train because I don't know if my coach would want me to do that but in season we do cut it back a bit from what we do in the summer/winter. Mostly because of workouts, though. That accounts for a bit of the mileage drop.
10/06/2011 10:44:38 PM
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I am a senior this year and have never had higher than a 43 mile week. I average between 37-40. I can relate to daniel as we drop under 30 during track. I think mileage should be based more on the individual and not just for the whole team. Course this is coming from a upstart small school program. Brandon Shemonia
I am a senior this year and have never had higher than a 43 mile week. I average between 37-40. I can relate to daniel as we drop under 30 during track. I think mileage should be based more on the individual and not just for the whole team. Course this is coming from a upstart small school program.

Brandon Shemonia
10/06/2011 10:56:24 PM
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David and Daniel had two phases after their junior year each season XC and track. In the off season their work was more extended in nature. With speed always being a part of their training. When working with Ammen the extended work transition to more intensive work in nature. Speed and more speed. If you look at it from a traditional matveyev periodization model it makes a lot of sense. Diane only hit 60miles once and that included two a days in a build to a peak (That was scary amount for her coach). After she ran a PR in 17:37.0in north Carolina 6th at footlocker regional in Kenosha and top twenty at nationals. I only coached Emily for one season. But she was a low mileage kid too. When training for international races her senior year I do know she often would uses cross training as means to get more work while keeping impacts low. One workout during the day running and the other crossing training later. Good luck and good coaching.
David and Daniel had two phases after their junior year each season XC and track. In the off season their work was more extended in nature. With speed always being a part of their training. When working with Ammen the extended work transition to more intensive work in nature. Speed and more speed. If you look at it from a traditional matveyev periodization model it makes a lot of sense.

Diane only hit 60miles once and that included two a days in a build to a peak (That was scary amount for her coach). After she ran a PR in 17:37.0in north Carolina 6th at footlocker regional in Kenosha and top twenty at nationals.

I only coached Emily for one season. But she was a low mileage kid too. When training for international races her senior year I do know she often would uses cross training as means to get more work while keeping impacts low. One workout during the day running and the other crossing training later.

Good luck and good coaching.
10/07/2011 10:09:22 AM
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@hansel960 First of all, how did you train with me for over a year and never know about York? I let you down there. Nunn has a book about them (I can't remember the name) and there is a picture in it that looks like a race because you see this long string of people, but really it's just a workout. York has a lot of detractors because people say that none of their runners improve in college, but there are certainly exceptions such as Don Sage and a girl that ran at ND when I was there. I would agree that there shouldn't be a lot of emphasis put on how many miles you are doing each week (Wisconsin avoids this problem with their "Badger miles" system). I think that Saylor's senior year he probably averaged about 65 miles a week and Storms' senior year he probably averaged about 50-55 mpw. Elliott probably was about the same as Storms, and Thater was probably just a hair under that. All of these guys certainly had weeks above this (most weeks in the offseason were probably above these), but you have to remember the mileage takes a hit once workouts and races start. I would bet money that no one from Potosi AVERAGED 100 mile weeks for an entire summer.
@hansel960

First of all, how did you train with me for over a year and never know about York? I let you down there. Nunn has a book about them (I can't remember the name) and there is a picture in it that looks like a race because you see this long string of people, but really it's just a workout. York has a lot of detractors because people say that none of their runners improve in college, but there are certainly exceptions such as Don Sage and a girl that ran at ND when I was there.

I would agree that there shouldn't be a lot of emphasis put on how many miles you are doing each week (Wisconsin avoids this problem with their "Badger miles" system). I think that Saylor's senior year he probably averaged about 65 miles a week and Storms' senior year he probably averaged about 50-55 mpw. Elliott probably was about the same as Storms, and Thater was probably just a hair under that. All of these guys certainly had weeks above this (most weeks in the offseason were probably above these), but you have to remember the mileage takes a hit once workouts and races start.

I would bet money that no one from Potosi AVERAGED 100 mile weeks for an entire summer.
10/07/2011 10:30:42 AM
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@MichaelFarmer I think it was Coaching Cross Country Successfully. However, when you have 150 - 200 runners out (just boys) each season, you can work them to the point of breaking and then sift through the strong that survive.
@MichaelFarmer
I think it was Coaching Cross Country Successfully.
However, when you have 150 - 200 runners out (just boys) each season, you can work them to the point of breaking and then sift through the strong that survive.
10/07/2011 10:33:13 AM
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Coach Davis of Potosi told me that they do a 90 mile 6 week peak heading into the beginning of their season. So, they try to get up to 90 miles per week for a month and half during the summer. I also know several kids from Carthage that have run 1000 miles during one summer of training; a couple of them went on to have success in college.
Coach Davis of Potosi told me that they do a 90 mile 6 week peak heading into the beginning of their season. So, they try to get up to 90 miles per week for a month and half during the summer. I also know several kids from Carthage that have run 1000 miles during one summer of training; a couple of them went on to have success in college.
10/07/2011 11:15:56 AM
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Like any good coach in any sport I believe it is all about evaluating your kids. This past summer we had very little serious mileage. We had to cut back to about 35 miles a week..this included 3x3mile morning recovery runs. We have avoided injuries, built base and after about 6 weeks actually really started training. We are improving every week with huge drops but due to the lack of serious summer miles I do not think we have time to catch up or reach our true potential... When we have had strong teams with serious summer miles it was a normal week for our girls to go over 50 and our boys to go past 60. Good coaches will also realize when kids are getting tapped and adjust accordingly; something that I have failed at a few times when I was young, stubborn, and/or stupid and that led to major injuries. I am a firm believer that in the elimination of "junk miles" I think too many kids focus on the number of miles instead of the quality of miles. That said, if as long a quality doesn't suffer, more is better.
Like any good coach in any sport I believe it is all about evaluating your kids.

This past summer we had very little serious mileage. We had to cut back to about 35 miles a week..this included 3x3mile morning recovery runs. We have avoided injuries, built base and after about 6 weeks actually really started training. We are improving every week with huge drops but due to the lack of serious summer miles I do not think we have time to catch up or reach our true potential...

When we have had strong teams with serious summer miles it was a normal week for our girls to go over 50 and our boys to go past 60. Good coaches will also realize when kids are getting tapped and adjust accordingly; something that I have failed at a few times when I was young, stubborn, and/or stupid and that led to major injuries.

I am a firm believer that in the elimination of "junk miles" I think too many kids focus on the number of miles instead of the quality of miles. That said, if as long a quality doesn't suffer, more is better.
10/07/2011 11:59:01 AM
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I think everybody pretty much agrees on the basics, and I agree that focusing on quality is very important. But coaches can also burn their kids out very easily by throwing them on the track to do intervals all the time as well. I'm a pretty firm believer in fartleks and tempo runs, especially early in the XC season. We have gone up to the track once this year so far. It is also evident that this doesn't apply across the whole team. Even York most likely doesn't run Group 6 over 30mpw. I'm an Asst Coach at St. Charles West by the way. We are re-building. They only had 4 kids out last year under a different coach. I also do Distance Track up there. When I was in high school at SCW in 01 and 02 we finished 3rd at State and in 03 after I left they finished 2nd. And nobody on the team did over 40mpw except Corey Swinney who was probably closer to 60 in the summer. Thomas
I think everybody pretty much agrees on the basics, and I agree that focusing on quality is very important. But coaches can also burn their kids out very easily by throwing them on the track to do intervals all the time as well. I'm a pretty firm believer in fartleks and tempo runs, especially early in the XC season. We have gone up to the track once this year so far. It is also evident that this doesn't apply across the whole team. Even York most likely doesn't run Group 6 over 30mpw.

I'm an Asst Coach at St. Charles West by the way. We are re-building. They only had 4 kids out last year under a different coach. I also do Distance Track up there.

When I was in high school at SCW in 01 and 02 we finished 3rd at State and in 03 after I left they finished 2nd. And nobody on the team did over 40mpw except Corey Swinney who was probably closer to 60 in the summer.

Thomas
10/18/2011 11:51:03 AM
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Ray-South certainly isn't any bastion of distance running now, but here is what I can tell you about a few of our guys: Geoff Hughes was 4th at state cross, ran 4:19/9:28, and never ran a 60 mile week. Stephen Saylor was 7th at state cross, ran 4:17/9:20, and AVERAGED 60 miles a week. I don't know that all coaches do this but for my runners it depends on their individual physiology and what I find works for them by trial and error as much as anything. I am pretty sure from talking to people from West Plains and people very close to people at West Plains that they run close to or above 100 miles per week at various points in the off-season/early season. I can't give you exact figures. However, it is worth noting that some of those athletes have been training for a few years prior to high school. To me that is a huge factor. A 16 year old who has training since they were 11 is completely different than a 16 year old who started running at age 14. Also, York does a lot of miles, but if you read Joe Newton's book, I think you will be more impressed that they do a LOT of their miles fast. I personally don't recommend their system. As a previous poster said, if you have 150-200 kids out for the sport every year, almost any system will work for 10-15 of them. That doesn't mean it is a good system (or a bad system) or that it is in the best long-term interests of the athlete. Personally I think the more potential a high school coach sees in an athlete, the more conservative they should be with them in high school. I trained like crazy in high school but that was OK because I had mediocre potential at best. I know that Dave Denny was fairly conservative in the way he trained Teg in high school; that is his genius. If you have someone with great potential, you owe it to them not to ruin them by doing too much too soon. Teg could probably have run sub-15:00 on our state course on 90 miles a week but he probably would not be sub-13:00 now had he done so. Sean Nunn Raytown South
Ray-South certainly isn't any bastion of distance running now, but here is what I can tell you about a few of our guys:

Geoff Hughes was 4th at state cross, ran 4:19/9:28, and never ran a 60 mile week.
Stephen Saylor was 7th at state cross, ran 4:17/9:20, and AVERAGED 60 miles a week.

I don't know that all coaches do this but for my runners it depends on their individual physiology and what I find works for them by trial and error as much as anything.

I am pretty sure from talking to people from West Plains and people very close to people at West Plains that they run close to or above 100 miles per week at various points in the off-season/early season. I can't give you exact figures. However, it is worth noting that some of those athletes have been training for a few years prior to high school. To me that is a huge factor. A 16 year old who has training since they were 11 is completely different than a 16 year old who started running at age 14.

Also, York does a lot of miles, but if you read Joe Newton's book, I think you will be more impressed that they do a LOT of their miles fast. I personally don't recommend their system. As a previous poster said, if you have 150-200 kids out for the sport every year, almost any system will work for 10-15 of them. That doesn't mean it is a good system (or a bad system) or that it is in the best long-term interests of the athlete.

Personally I think the more potential a high school coach sees in an athlete, the more conservative they should be with them in high school. I trained like crazy in high school but that was OK because I had mediocre potential at best. I know that Dave Denny was fairly conservative in the way he trained Teg in high school; that is his genius. If you have someone with great potential, you owe it to them not to ruin them by doing too much too soon. Teg could probably have run sub-15:00 on our state course on 90 miles a week but he probably would not be sub-13:00 now had he done so.

Sean Nunn
Raytown South
10/18/2011 12:25:16 PM
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[quote=seannunn] Personally I think the more potential a high school coach sees in an athlete, the more conservative they should be with them in high school. I trained like crazy in high school but that was OK because I had mediocre potential at best. I know that Dave Denny was fairly conservative in the way he trained Teg in high school; that is his genius. If you have someone with great potential, you owe it to them not to ruin them by doing too much too soon. Teg could probably have run sub-15:00 on our state course on 90 miles a week but he probably would not be sub-13:00 now had he done so. Sean Nunn Raytown South[/quote] @seannunn Dog gone Sean. You and I have argued this point in the past, on opposite sides. This is exactly the way I see it. I think this is twice we have agreed on something. This must stop.:-]
seannunn wrote:


Personally I think the more potential a high school coach sees in an athlete, the more conservative they should be with them in high school. I trained like crazy in high school but that was OK because I had mediocre potential at best. I know that Dave Denny was fairly conservative in the way he trained Teg in high school; that is his genius. If you have someone with great potential, you owe it to them not to ruin them by doing too much too soon. Teg could probably have run sub-15:00 on our state course on 90 miles a week but he probably would not be sub-13:00 now had he done so.

Sean Nunn
Raytown South


@seannunn Dog gone Sean. You and I have argued this point in the past, on opposite sides. This is exactly the way I see it. I think this is twice we have agreed on something. This must stop.
10/19/2011 1:52:37 PM
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[quote=Purpledog]seannunn Personally I think the more potential a high school coach sees in an athlete, the more conservative they should be with them in high school. I trained like crazy in high school but that was OK because I had mediocre potential at best. I know that Dave Denny was fairly conservative in the way he trained Teg in high school; that is his genius. If you have someone with great potential, you owe it to them not to ruin them by doing too much too soon. Teg could probably have run sub-15:00 on our state course on 90 miles a week but he probably would not be sub-13:00 now had he done so. Sean Nunn Raytown South @seannunn Dog gone Sean. You and I have argued this point in the past, on opposite sides. This is exactly the way I see it. I think this is twice we have agreed on something. This must stop.[/quote] @Purpledog My thinking may have changed to agree with you more. Obviously what you did for Dalton Moberly worked. I don't know if I have ever coached someone with his talent or not (Saylor and Hughes are/were close). Sean Nunn Raytown South
Purpledog wrote:
seannunn

Personally I think the more potential a high school coach sees in an athlete, the more conservative they should be with them in high school. I trained like crazy in high school but that was OK because I had mediocre potential at best. I know that Dave Denny was fairly conservative in the way he trained Teg in high school; that is his genius. If you have someone with great potential, you owe it to them not to ruin them by doing too much too soon. Teg could probably have run sub-15:00 on our state course on 90 miles a week but he probably would not be sub-13:00 now had he done so.

Sean Nunn
Raytown South

@seannunn Dog gone Sean. You and I have argued this point in the past, on opposite sides. This is exactly the way I see it. I think this is twice we have agreed on something. This must stop.


@Purpledog

My thinking may have changed to agree with you more. Obviously what you did for Dalton Moberly worked.
I don't know if I have ever coached someone with his talent or not (Saylor and Hughes are/were close).

Sean Nunn
Raytown South
10/19/2011 8:36:21 PM
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Hey all, its been a while. I moved from St. Louis to work at a church down in Tuscaloosa and am working with a powerhouse (for Alabama) program down here. I can speak a bit to Daniel and David Everett's training and why the whole mileage debate in high school is much more intricate than we would like to think. Because we are lazy Americans who do not do 50 mile weeks starting at the age of 9, we lag behind other countries in aerobic development in high school. I could never have most kids jump up to 100 mile weeks in high school because they would burn out very quickly. We tend to underestimate the strain that mileage puts on the body. Couple that with the fact that most young runners do not know how to truly run "easy mileage" and you have a nightmare on your hands. For others, like the Everetts, who could have handled higher mileage than I gave them you run the risk of making them unappealing to colleges. Daniel and David are some of those rare talents who have enough raw talent to not run for a year and still go run a sub 18 5K. So, for high school there was no point to upping their mileage...I knew they would get that in college. High school was a time to learn to love running and hunger for more. I can tell you from experience that a 4:06 miler who only runs 35 miles a week is one hot pickup for a college team. You also have to look at the intensity of the miles. Most of their workouts were fairly intense. 6-8x800 at 2:15-20 w/2 minute recovery on a hilly course was a light day. The team I am working with right now is more high-mileage so our top guy (16:58 guy) will do more mileage, but his workouts are longer and lighter (i.e. 7x1K at 3:15 with equal rest). Now, don't go attacking me. I know the need for a good aerobic base. There is a time and place in someone's life for 100 mile weeks. However, with the long term interests of the athlete in mind most American high school runners are not candidates for those kind of weeks in my mind. This is a great thread but just don't get carried away thinking there is some magic number.
Hey all, its been a while. I moved from St. Louis to work at a church down in Tuscaloosa and am working with a powerhouse (for Alabama) program down here. I can speak a bit to Daniel and David Everett's training and why the whole mileage debate in high school is much more intricate than we would like to think. Because we are lazy Americans who do not do 50 mile weeks starting at the age of 9, we lag behind other countries in aerobic development in high school. I could never have most kids jump up to 100 mile weeks in high school because they would burn out very quickly. We tend to underestimate the strain that mileage puts on the body. Couple that with the fact that most young runners do not know how to truly run "easy mileage" and you have a nightmare on your hands. For others, like the Everetts, who could have handled higher mileage than I gave them you run the risk of making them unappealing to colleges. Daniel and David are some of those rare talents who have enough raw talent to not run for a year and still go run a sub 18 5K. So, for high school there was no point to upping their mileage...I knew they would get that in college. High school was a time to learn to love running and hunger for more. I can tell you from experience that a 4:06 miler who only runs 35 miles a week is one hot pickup for a college team. You also have to look at the intensity of the miles. Most of their workouts were fairly intense. 6-8x800 at 2:15-20 w/2 minute recovery on a hilly course was a light day. The team I am working with right now is more high-mileage so our top guy (16:58 guy) will do more mileage, but his workouts are longer and lighter (i.e. 7x1K at 3:15 with equal rest). Now, don't go attacking me. I know the need for a good aerobic base. There is a time and place in someone's life for 100 mile weeks. However, with the long term interests of the athlete in mind most American high school runners are not candidates for those kind of weeks in my mind. This is a great thread but just don't get carried away thinking there is some magic number.
10/19/2011 11:44:19 PM
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Do you think most college coaches would prefer an athlete (given all race times are equal) who ran 60mpw focused on base mileage or a guy on 40mpw who has been run ragged on the track with interval after interval. I would probably go for the former.
Do you think most college coaches would prefer an athlete (given all race times are equal) who ran 60mpw focused on base mileage or a guy on 40mpw who has been run ragged on the track with interval after interval.

I would probably go for the former.
10/20/2011 8:33:05 AM
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Joined: Jul 2008
Posts: 52
Chris, I tend to agree with your thoughts. I enjoyed reading Meb's book "Run to Overcome" last spring and found his low mileage interesting. I have had several athletes and parents want their kids to run too much too fast, often resulting in injuries. The following quote from Meb Keflezighi is from and interview last week in American Track and Field: "RBR: What was training like in high school? MEB: I ran very low mileage in high school: 9th grade 20-30 wk 10th grade 25-35 wk 11th grade 35-40 wk 12th grade 40-55 wk The low mileage in high school kept my potential for college and beyond very high. One of the reasons I have had such a long running career is because I didn't exhaust my body in high school and college. Now-a-days there are high school kids running close to 100 miles a week. I didn't do that much mileage until I turned professional." In his book he talks of his mileage in college getting up to 60-65 his freshman year of college and slowly increasing. I also thought that I remembered reading years ago that Mary Decker-Slaney was only running 35 miles a week when she set the 1500m record. I think it depends on the kids, their age, and how long they have been running. Unfortunately, many parents see the successes of some programs that run 80+/week and think that is what their child should be doing. This summer Jessica Jackson shared with me during Jake's SWMO camp that she ran about 35 per week her sr. year and we can't argue with her success! Some bodies simply cannot handle the stress of mileage, mine personally cut out at about 60-70 mi/wk in college. Yet it was fine until that point. What works with some, will not work with all. It is all interesting. Darbi Stancell McDonald County
Chris, I tend to agree with your thoughts.

I enjoyed reading Meb's book "Run to Overcome" last spring and found his low mileage interesting. I have had several athletes and parents want their kids to run too much too fast, often resulting in injuries. The following quote from Meb Keflezighi is from and interview last week in American Track and Field:

"RBR: What was training like in high school?

MEB: I ran very low mileage in high school:
9th grade 20-30 wk
10th grade 25-35 wk
11th grade 35-40 wk
12th grade 40-55 wk

The low mileage in high school kept my potential for college and beyond very high. One of the reasons I have had such a long running career is because I didn't exhaust my body in high school and college. Now-a-days there are high school kids running close to 100 miles a week. I didn't do that much mileage until I turned professional."

In his book he talks of his mileage in college getting up to 60-65 his freshman year of college and slowly increasing. I also thought that I remembered reading years ago that Mary Decker-Slaney was only running 35 miles a week when she set the 1500m record. I think it depends on the kids, their age, and how long they have been running. Unfortunately, many parents see the successes of some programs that run 80+/week and think that is what their child should be doing. This summer Jessica Jackson shared with me during Jake's SWMO camp that she ran about 35 per week her sr. year and we can't argue with her success! Some bodies simply cannot handle the stress of mileage, mine personally cut out at about 60-70 mi/wk in college. Yet it was fine until that point. What works with some, will not work with all.

It is all interesting.
Darbi Stancell
McDonald County
10/20/2011 9:00:49 AM
Coach
SUBSCRIBER
Joined: Dec 1969
Posts: 1040
@stangscc Though Jessica may have only run around 35 miles per week; you must also note that she was at the YMCA pool 2 - 3 mornings per week swimming...and not just swimming, but swimming hard.
@stangscc
Though Jessica may have only run around 35 miles per week; you must also note that she was at the YMCA pool 2 - 3 mornings per week swimming...and not just swimming, but swimming hard.

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