Six Years, Ten Stories I'll always remember: #8 Carlos Davis 212-5

I'll leave this site with so many memories of being your webmaster the past 6 years. I've compiled my list of 10 stories I'll always remember. This is not intended to be a list of the best athletes but simply personal reflections of the stories we have brought you over the past half a dozen years. My thanks to Craig Martin who's ability to tell a story is one I envy. Finally this list is really just ten stories presented one at a time as opposed to a ranking.

Carlos Davis not only set a state record in 2014 but he changed the infield when he threw at the 2015 meet. The infield and awards stand were reconfigured to keep those in attendance safe from the distances the Davis brothers might be able to throw. In fact the Long Jumpers were even held when they lined up to throw.


Here is Craig Martin's story from 2014


MSHSAA Class 3 & 4 State Track & Field Championships

There was so much anticipation for something special to happen that even Governor Jay Nixon made an appearance to watch Carlos and Khalil Davis throw the discus.

The Blue Springs junior twins succeeded in putting on a show that captured the crowd’s attention Saturday at the MSHSAA Class 3-4 Track & Field Championships at Lincoln University’s Dwight T. Reed Stadium.

On his second preliminary throw, Carlos unleashed the disc with the perfect arc and rotation, and it seemed to hang in the air forever. When it finally landed, Carlos had set a new all-time Missouri record with a distance of 212 feet, 5 inches, placing him No. 19 on the all-time U.S. high school performance list.

“I knew it was going to be a good one, but I didn’t know it was going to be 212. It was unbelievable,” Carlos said. “I felt like it was going to be a good throw; when it left my hand I knew. I just saw it and it just … sailed. It was the perfect down the middle throw.

“That means we’re doing something right if the Governor is going to come watch. I appreciate it, and if he was here I would’ve told him thank you.”

Carlos entered the event seeded second behind Khalil after throwing 194-7 at sectionals, which had been a 7-foot PR from his conference performance. Carlos had lost to his brother at both districts and sectionals.

“I didn’t want to lose to Khalil again,” Carlos said. “He beat me the two weeks before, and I didn’t want to lose to him again. He’s been getting me the last two weeks on the last throw.”

Khalil, who finished second with a throw of 197-0, said he knew instantly that Carlos had a monster throw.

“I knew as soon as it left his hand, ‘Man, that’s 200.’ I was like, ‘Dang it.’ I know I can get it, it’s just a matter of when,” Khalil said. “I was thinking, ‘Now I have to work even harder because, man, that’s going to be hard to beat. I might have to take a second place today.’ I’ll get him. If it’s not next year, I’ll get him sometime.

“It’s always fun. I like to see him do well. And when he does well I like to do even better. And then he does better than me. Someone always has to set the pace for the meet, and he did it today.”

Khalil said the hot, humid weather was making his hands sweaty, and he was having a hard time gripping the disc. He was able to get some chalk for his last attempt, which was the one that moved him into second place.

Khalil had made a habit of beating Carlos on the last throw all season, and Carlos had only defeated his brother twice all spring. Khalil entered as the top seed and boasts a PR of 198-5 from the conference championships.

Carlos said he had been feeling a little wrist soreness from an injury he thought occurred in the weight room. It had been hurting him on his release, but all the pain disappeared at the state meet.

Now that he’s listed among the all-time top high school performances, Carlos said there’s only one thing to do.

“That’s just so crazy to me. I’m just living in the moment right now,” Carlos said. “I get to come back next year. Work hard and do what I did this year but better.”

The twins, who have committed to Nebraska for football and track, will travel to compete at the Great Southwest and the USATF Junior Outdoor Championships in Eugene, Ore., before turning their attention back to football.